How TreeCoin Aims to Plant 37 Million Trees Over Its Lifecycle

“If you really think the economy is more important than the environment, try holding your breath whilst you count your money.” ~ Dr.Guy McPherson 

Have you ever noticed the worldwide stress over trade disputes? The entire global economy goes haywire at the first sign of a major disagreement amid leading countries. Financial secretaries, financial ministeries, and even the top-level administration initiate pre-emptive measures to prevent any further damages.

However, what happens when the news of Greenland losing over 12.5 billion tons of ice in a day comes through? Niche environmental publications publish reports, environmentalists, and scientists express their worries, urging people and politicians to act. The result, a little to no action around the world.

The team at TreeCoin says, “Not on our watch.” TreeCoin is aware of the seismic damages our planet has taken over the past few decades. With the little political will to resolve these problems, this is the right time to take the matters in our own hands.

How TreeCoin is making a difference

The world consumed roughly 340 million m3 of timber in 2018, 334 million m3 in 2017, and it is likely to consume over 359 million m3 by 2020. Unfortunately, a significant portion of these supplies comes through unsustainable timber production practices. At this rate, researchers estimate that we need 1½ earths to fulfill our current timber consumption. That is unlikely to happen.

TreeCoin is set to establish a sustainable timber harvesting and management model that can provide for our needs without degrading the environment. Here is how we do it.

How TreeCoin Aims to Plant 37 Million Trees Over Its Lifecycle

Choosing a location that needs real help

TreeCoin location: Paraguay

Paraguay is facing one of the highest rates of deforestation in the world. Therefore, it makes sense to address the problem at ground zero. TreeCoin has chosen deforested, degenerated, over-acidified by livestock farming and plundered areas, for its project, allowing us to improve the soil in the long term.

Creating a sustainable timber harvesting cycle

TreeCoin has carefully planned a 23-year harvesting cycle. Here is a breakdown of the planting and harvesting schedule:

  • Year 1: Planting saplings. Taking care of them.
  • Year 2: Pruning of the trees begin once they reach 11 meters.
  • Year 4: Trees are approximately 20 meters long and have a diameter of 30 centimeters. For optimal growth, every alternative tree is cut and sold to paper manufacturers and the energy industry. This thinning of tree coverage provides sufficient space for the growth of individual trees.
  • Year 8: Another harvest occurs to ensure that trees receive sufficient sunlight and space to grow. The trees are around 45 centimeters in diameter, ideal for parquet flooring and general timber use.
  • Year 11: The trees have a diameter of roughly 60 centimeters, achieving maximum growth. A final harvest occurs. This timber is suitable for furniture, veneer, roof and parquet industry.
  • The land is ready for another harvest, starting with the sapling plantation stage.

Planting over 37 million trees

TreeCoin aims to plant and harvest over 37 million trees over its project lifecycle. TreeCoin will reinvest a sizeable portion of its profits towards growing the project. It will own roughly 59,650 hectares of land by the end of its 23-year project cycle.

How TreeCoin Aims to Plant 37 Million Trees Over Its Lifecycle

TreeCoin: Building social projects for natives and local employees

Moreover, TreeCoin will donate up to 10% of its profits for social projects in the local area. It intends to take up multiple social initiatives, such as water treatment, hospitals, childcare centers, foundations, and associations for disabled people.

At TreeCoin, everyone is aware of the grim challenges humanity faces. Our goal is to develop a sustainable timber production model for ourselves and other timber suppliers. The planet needs sustainable projects, and we’re ready to answer its call. Are you?


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